Dolphins and seabirds seen on 1st Wildlife trip of 2017

Mermaid ll’s first trip of the year set out on a January day that put a lot of the previous summer to shame! The sun shone and the sea was flat and a few birders down to start their New Year lists in Cornwall joined us mostly in the hope of finding the returning Pacific Diver. This proved just as elusive from a boat as it usually is from shore as we only had one or two glimpses. Despite heading back to where the bird had been, it had already gone further offshore in search of bait-fish. There was no lack of other wildlife however; 40+ Common Dolphin showed well, “Sammy” the dominant Grey Seal bull and some of his harem and pups were relaxing on St Clement’s Isle, and there were good numbers of seabirds; 15+ Great Northern Diver, Gannets, 5 Eider including the resident drake, 3 Velvet Scoter, 16 +Common Scoter, Guillemots and 1 Razorbill, and we even managed distant views of the Eastern Black Redstart currently resident under the Rockpool Café at Mousehole.

If you would like to book one of our trips for 2017, please call 07901731201 or enquire at www.cornwallboattrips.co.uk/enquiry and we will get back to you.

The first pictures are of the Common Dolphin and “Sammy”. The bird pictures are as follows:- Great Northern Diver, Gannet, Eider male and female in flight, Velvet Scoter, flock of Common Scoter, Guillemot, Kingfisher in Newlyn harbour, Shag with a wrasse. Photos and text by Martin Elliot.

 

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Basking Sharks

We are glad to report sightings of Basking Sharks today. They were few and far between last year, but they have definitely arrived now. The Bay has been full of fantastic wildlife so far this year. The Bowhead Whale, Humpback Whales, Basking Sharks, Common Dolphins, Bottlenose Dolphins, Harbour Porpoises, Barrel Jellyfish and Grey Seals and its still only May!  Hopefully this bodes well for the rest of the season.

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Bowhead Whale in Mounts Bay

What an incredible sight here in Cornish waters. A bowhead whale! These beautiful whales are usually found in Arctic or sub-Arctic waters, so you can imagine how dumbfounded we were to see one off Long Rock Beach! We watched in wonderment as this graceful creature surfaced and dived right in front of us, too stunned to even reach for the camera. As it started to move southwards, blowing as it went, we eventually regained our wits and tried to capture the moment. Unfortunately the photos aren’t great and most definitely do not do the moment justice, but they do prove that you never know what you might see here in Cornwall. The marine environment is changing every year and it is more than evident in the variety of species we are seeing here now.

 

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A few facts on the Bowhead whale and why this sighting is so special:-

The bowhead whale got its name from its bow-shaped skull.  It’s body is black with a whitish chin patch broken by what resembles a necklace of black spots. The bowhead is also identified by its lack of dorsal fin and two bumps which are usually visible above the water corresponding to the head and the back. The whale produces a V shaped blow from paired blowholes situated at the highest point of the head, often reaching 7m in height. We did see a few fantastic blows in the bay. The bowheads baleen is the longest of any whale at over 3m and is used to strain tiny prey from the water. The whale’s blubber is the thickest of any animal!

 

Bowhead WhaleImage From SuperCentenarian.com

The reason for the thickness of the blubber is due to it’s natural habitat of Arctic waters. They are often found close to the edge of the Arctic ice shelf.  Now we all complain of the cold in Cornwall, but the waters are definitely not Arctic! Their bow shaped head is used to break through ice up to 60cm thick. Now that’s some ice! Bowheads migrate north and south of the Arctic as the ice retreats and expands. The whales prefer bays, straits and estuaries, and are seldom found far from ice floes. That is why this was truly was a spectacular sight.

 

Bowhead-Whale_Tim-Melling-3Image by Tim Melling http://hww.ca/en/wildlife/mammals/bowhead-whale.html

 

 

Dalmatian Pelican seen by our Wildlife Expert Martin Elliot

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The Dalmation Pelican was first seen over Gwithian on Saturday, but was mis-identified as a White Pelican. It was correctly identified as Dalmatian Pelican from photographs taken on Sunday (8th) when the bird was seen on the sea off St Ives and later Cape Cornwall and Land’s End. For the last 2 days the bird has been moving between the scattered small pools between Sennen and St Levan. The bird was seen in Poland in early April, then crossed Germany and France before reaching Cornwall. Dalmatian Pelican used to breed in Britain in the Bronze Age and currently breeds from eastern Europe- particularly northern Greece, across the former Soviet Union, through Mongolia into China and south east Asia where it’s populations have declined drastically through persecution by fishermen and habitat loss. The World population is estimated at less than 15,000 birds and, despite conservation measures resulting in increasing or stable populations in eastern Europe and Turkey, the species’ IUCN classification is “Vulnerable”.

     The “fuss” about this particular individual is that it may constitute the first acceptable record of this species since it’s extinction as a breeding bird in the U.K. There have been previous sightings, but these are presumed to refer to escapes from captivity ( though this species is relatively rare in collections and zoos compared to White or Pink-backed Pelicans). However, given this bird’s known movement from Poland thanks to easterly weather patterns, it’s lack of leg-rings or tags, and obviously good condition (captive birds are often stained and/or show damaged wing feathering) it would appear to be a good candidate for our first genuinely wild bird for centuries! The European breeders are not strongly migratory but “dispersive” and given to wandering, whereas the populations east of the Black Sea are migratory and move north to their colonies in early Spring. Dalmatian Pelican has a huge wingspan of over 10 feet and like most large birds relies on thermals or strong head-winds to gain enough height to travel long distances on migration. This can encourage birds to “over-shoot” or move in un-favourable directions to avoid bad weather. The local weather – moderate easterlies with low cloud, rain and fog- is probably the only reason this bird has spent the last few days in West Cornwall as it is unable to soar, and has been forced to use often ridiculously small pools, where local birders have been concerned about the bird’s ability to feed.
     Whatever the bird’s status, it is an impressive sight, dwarfing local herons and looming across the fields and valleys of West Penwith, and an increasing number of birders from all over the country are hoping it will remain for a while longer before it resumes it’s wandering! MTE_1123 MTE_1127 MTE_1145-001 MTE_1298 MTE_1306

New season on its way!

Well a new season is on its way! The Mermaid II is currently out of the water having her annual maintenance work done, and a freshen up! The engine has had a good over haul and now Adrian is praying every day for fine weather so he can paint her up! So far the hull has had a good sand down and a fresh lick of anti-fouling, new anodes and a smart new white line!

Lets hope the weather this year is better than last. We suffered with strong winds last summer which did not make for very pleasurable sea conditions on many occasions. However, our sightings of dolphins, porpoises and whales were extremely good, and hopefully made up for the bumpy rides!

Easter is early this year, so Mermaid II will be back in the water and ready to go at the end of March.

Please note our new prices. We have always tried to keep our prices low so everyone can enjoy the beauty of our seas. Unfortunately, extra expenses have been put on to our business, so we have had to make these increases this year.

We hope you are coming to see us this season and look forward to lovely sunshine, clear seas, plentiful marine life and tight lines!

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TROPICBIRD ON ST CLEMENT’S ISLAND, MOUSEHOLE

STOP PRESS!!

At around 4pm yesterday the Mermaid II cruised into the small bay on the lea-ward side of St Clement’s Island looking to show the 20 or so passengers on the 3pm “Seal Cove” trip the resident Grey Seal bull “Sammy”. I have no idea if they saw him because Adrian and crew were amazed to see a large white bird with a long, pointed, slightly down-curved orange bill, and long white tail-streamers sitting above Sammy’s usual spot. It almost immediately took flight over the island. I would probably have heard no more about it had Adrian and Billy not already kindly sent me down-loaded photos of a Red-billed Tropicbird they claimed to have seen as a wind-up a week ago when I was stuck on the Scillonian III, the same day as a genuine bird had been seen from Porthgwarra! Remembering this however, Adrian immediately recognised this as the real thing, and they steamed around to the eastern side of the island hoping it had landed again. There was some confusion as an orange-billed bird took off and was snapped by one of the passengers, but this was an Oystercatcher, and sadly it seems the initial sighting took everyone by surprise and the Tropicbird was already out over the bay! Readers may well wonder a) what all the fuss is about, and b) how on Earth we can be sure this is the same bird as that seen last week!? The answer is the same – this is an incredibly rare bird in British terms with only 3-4 previous records; Red-billed Tropicbird breeds all around the tropics with the nearest to us in the Cape Verdes or Caribbean. As there have been virtually nothing but north-north-easterly winds since the Porthgwarra sighting it is highly unlikely a second bird has arrived! And how do I know this is a definite second sighting? Because I am sitting writing this in North- blooming – Oxfordshire – that’s why!! Today’s 3pm trip was the first wild-life trip I have not been able to do since the tropicbird sighting a week last Friday, and if readers are wondering what that distant crunching noise is it is the sound of me grinding my teeth down to the gum-line!! Of course- I am really pleased for all the lucky folks on the trip (AM I HELL!!!), and I hope the bird is seen again, as the Mermaid II is probably the best place to start! Here’s hoping!

Disgruntled of Banbury/ Martin Elliott

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Photo:http://uniquewildlife.blogspot.com/2011/03/tropicbirds.html

Pelagic Trip 29th August

It may look like we are always making excuses for our pelagics this year, but we really have had no luck at all with conditions except- adding insult to injury- the one trip we had to cancel because of low bookings! The 29th looked like being even worse because the wind was wrong and yet this came after one of the best week’s sea-watching of the year so far locally, so expectations were higher than usual right up to the late night forecast on Friday. Add to this the fact that 3 of our passengers were “coming-down” after the highs of seeing Red-billed Tropicbird and Hump-back Whale from Porthgwarra on the Friday and you will understand why I worried about our trip.
My fears seemed well founded at first; there was a very light south-westerly that dropped to almost nothing, a deceptively big swell still running after the previous high winds, and almost inevitably the 100s of Gannets which had been feeding around the Runnel Stone the day before, along with a few Cory’s Shearwaters (not to mention the Tropicbird and Hump-back!) were nowhere to be seen. We did come across our first Grey Phalarope – a moulting adult- off Tater Dhu which instantly meant this trip could not be as bad as the infamous 8/8, but again we could not get as far west as we hoped due to the swell so our chum “drift” would barely clear Longships.

Despite the wind, we did attract several Storm Petrels at first, but as time wore on the wind died to nothing, the sun came out, and the trickle of Stormies dried up.
However, it was then bought to our attention there was a pod of Pilot whales close by. There followed an anxious and intense journey to catch up with these great mammals. Finally we glimpsed them away to our south-west. Despite the relief, Adrian was almost too cautious in approaching them and I thought they would leave us behind – but we need not have worried! We stopped a couple of hundred metres off the group and then began one of the most amazing wildlife encounters we will probably ever have!

 

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No sooner had we stopped when more than half the pod started to swim straight at us- lead by the females with calves (4-5 in this group). There were about 19 animals and soon all of them were surrounding the Mermaid II within touching distance as the males (about 7m long and with distinctive “elbowed” dorsal fins with deeply down-curved and rounded tips) joined in. They may have been trying to drive the females and calves away from the boat as a couple of times they went under our hull and released huge columns of bubbles. However, the youngsters wouldn’t be put off and they began spy-hopping (to look at us?) and the whole pod seemed to relax. We then had almost an hour where you did not know where to look; the 2nd group of about 10 animals rejoined our pod (the only time there were signs of aggression as a couple of males began tail-slapping, but this was brief), youngsters were spy-hopping, many of the older animals began rolling on their backs waving their long, tapered pectoral fins in the air (conveniently identifying them as Long-finned Pilot Whales – Globicephala melas melas), there were whales constantly rolling and jostling all around the boat, and all this accompanied by what I can only describe as a chorus of comedy farting noises!!!!

 

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I have no idea if these were deliberate “vocalisations”, or just an unfortunate consequence of blowing through partially submerged blow-holes, but as the whales only made the usual puffing noises when producing a blow it is tempting to think these noises were deliberate. There seemed to be two main types; a short, relatively soft “raspberry”, and extremely loud, almost percussive “wet-farts” that sounded like the slapping of a huge cow-pat, apparently given by the males – and the first clue I had that the second group were approaching- like a herd of marine Spike Milligans!

 

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To put this into context I, and especially Adrian are used to seeing dolphins playing around the boat, and we will never tire of it. But this was different! Common Dolphins are more cat-like; they come to the boat to bow-ride, surf the stern-wash or even scratch their backs on the hull, but if we slow or stop they usually drift off, and – if they are feeding- ignore us altogether. The pilot whales were much more laid-back and seemed both interested in and accepting of us. I will regret to my dying day that I didn’t at least reach out and touch one as I doubt I’ll ever have another chance, but it seemed wrong at the time and is probably un-ethical. However, knowing that these whales are the species prone to mass-stranding, and worse are murdered by the Faroese for the sake of tradition, made the encounter all the more special.

 

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It was a real wrench to have to leave the whales behind in the end as we were running late, and I was almost emotional when we did head off as for the first couple of hundred metres a few followed us and rode the wake. But these whales live in extremely tight-knit social groups and they clearly didn’t want to go far. The rest of our pelagic was therefore a bit of an anti-climax, and I have to admit the excitement and media chaos meant I forgot to tally up our sea-bird totals; we saw about a dozen Storm Petrel, 5 Balearic Shearwaters, 6 Grey Phalaropes, a couple of Bonxies, Common Dolphins, Harbour Porpoise etc, but I can’t remember if we saw Sooty Shearwater or Arctic Skua and I don’t think those lucky enough to be on board will mind either! Thanks to them for coming, thanks to Geoff for guiding us whale-wards, and thanks to Adrian for sticking by the pelagics when he could have made more money from mackerel-fishing. This will be the last pelagic of the old format- we will do shorter, early morning/ late evening trips from now on, but what a season’s finale this was!

 

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